Social network giant has Facebook has unveiled the biggest changes in years to its News Feed.

The firm’s CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, said the major revamp was designed to reduce clutter on the site and give users a homepage akin to a personalised newspaper.

Bigger is better is the philosophy Facebook has taken with its News Feed tweaks, with photographs, check-ins and other every day updates now appearing much larger on the page than previously.

With photos now accounting for around 50% of content on Facebook’s News Feed, the move was the next logical step for the social network giant to take – giving much more emphasis to the visual side of its site.

Zuckerberg said: “The design of your news feed needs to reflect this evolving face of who you’re sharing with.”

The emphasis on images also means that there is liable to be much more striking adverts on the social networking site. After all, ads are an important factor for Facebook as it continues to try to prove its worth to Wall Street – a relationship that was been rocky ever since its stock market flotation.

Facebook actually only started showing ads for the first time last year, but the response to its Sponsored Stories and promoted posts offerings has been somewhat mixed.

Internet marketing professionals often put precedence on ads on the News Feed itself rather than sites other ads as they often attract a higher click through rate.

Users may find the prominence of bigger ads a bit of a turn off, but for those in the PPC marketing business it could prove to offer a chance to attract even more clicks – ultimately, the more advertisers, the more money there will be coming in for Facebook.

News brought to you by ClickThrough – experts in Search Engine Marketing & Internet Marketing.

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About the author:

Martin Boonham is an online copywriter for ClickThrough Marketing, he has worked there since October 2012. He has a Masters in Print Journalism from Nottingham Trent University, where he also gained his NCTJ qualification at the same time; achieving qualifications in subbing, shorthand and media law.