Digital ad spend in the UK is set to top more than £6 billion according to a new report.

The research from eMarketer suggests search engine giant Google will account for a staggering 44% of the total spend, with Facebook drawing in five per cent.

The new estimates from eMarketer show an increase in the market share of online advertising from Google, up from 41.6% last year. Despite its share looking tiny in comparison to Google’s, Facebook has also seen an increase in the market, up from 4.1% in 2012.

It is the first time eMarketer has done a comparison between the two Internet giants. It predicts Google will earn £2.65bn in net UK ad revenues this year. Facebook on the other hand will earn around £279m, up 25% on last year.

Last year, Google accounted for almost two-thirds (62.5%) of the UK’s search ad market. Search ads are a fundamental part of a PPC marketing strategy, generating advertising on the Search Engine Results Page (SERP) typically based around the keywords a user entered when making their search query. Located at the top and side of the SERP, they present the user with a number of paid ads to select from, aside from the usual organic results on the page.

The increase in mobile Internet usage is only likely to further bump up Google’s search potential.

In terms of the digital display ad market however, figures between Facebook and Google are much closer, with Google accounting for 19.6% and Facebook accounting for 17.5% of the £1.5bn industry in the UK this year.

Again, with mobile advertising becoming more and more prominent, both companies expect to see a strong growth in the sector.

News brought to you by ClickThrough – a best practice Internet Marketing Agency.

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About the author:

Martin Boonham is an online copywriter for ClickThrough Marketing, he has worked there since October 2012. He has a Masters in Print Journalism from Nottingham Trent University, where he also gained his NCTJ qualification at the same time; achieving qualifications in subbing, shorthand and media law.