A report has suggested UK smartphone users between the age of 18-24 are much more likely to react to mobile advertising than other age groups.

The comScore MobiLens study also highlighted an increased engagement from the same demographic towards advertising on social media sites.

The study revealed over half (56.2%) of those surveyed in the 18-24 bracket said they read posts from organisations, brands and events. This compared to a 35.5% overall total. A further 26.7% of the same demographic admitted to clicking on an advert feature on a social network site, compared to a total percentage of 16.5%.

On the web, the research revealed 38.1% of the 18-24 bracket said they recalled seeing ads compared to an overall total of 26.5%.

The study was conducted by comScore, an Internet technology firm that provides analysis of peoples interactions in the digital world, in March.

With more than two-thirds (67%) of UK mobile users – around 33.4 million Brits in total – expected to be using a smartphone this year according to the study, the challenge for digital marketing agencies is now pitching mobile advertising to the right demographics.

Further evidence on the importance of mobile ads can be seen in a Marin study conducted back in February (2013). The research found smartphones generated Click Through Rates (CTR) 107% higher than desktops.

It also found many UK advertisers had already doubled their search budget on smart devices, including smartphones and tablets, from 9.94% to 19.32% at the end of last year – a trend likely to continue as smart devices become more and more prominent.

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About the author:

Martin Boonham is an online copywriter for ClickThrough Marketing, he has worked there since October 2012. He has a Masters in Print Journalism from Nottingham Trent University, where he also gained his NCTJ qualification at the same time; achieving qualifications in subbing, shorthand and media law.