Facebook is set to simplify its ad offerings under a radical overhaul of its current advertising system.

The shakeup is intended to make if far easier for digital marketing professionals to use the platform.

Currently users have no fewer than 27 types of ad to choose from and for those not familiar with advertising on the social networking site it can be quite a lot to process.

Describing the changes in more detail on its newsroom site, Facebook product manager for ads, Fidji Simo, said: “Over the past year, we have been gathering feedback from marketers about our ads products.

“One point we heard loud and clear is that we need to simplify our product offering.”

It is likely the firm will cut the 27 present ad types by more than half, with the aim of providing a more streamlined experience for those using the platform for social media marketing.

Instead, the firm seeking to place the ad will be asked what they wish to achieve with it, for example building its brand image or encouraging more visitors to visit its online stores.

Facebook is also aiming to make ads look far more consistent, aided by the severe cull on ad types available, and is also looking to bring sponsored stories to all its ad products, a move designed to help marketers get the most out of their media budgets.

Simo added: “Our vision is that over time, an advertiser can come to Facebook and tell us what they are trying to achieve, and our ads tools will automatically suggest the right combination of products to help them achieve it.”

Internet Marketing News from ClickThrough – an integrated digital marketing agency offering web design services, web development, SEO, PPC, content, online PR and conversion optimisation.

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About the author:

Martin Boonham is an online copywriter for ClickThrough Marketing, he has worked there since October 2012. He has a Masters in Print Journalism from Nottingham Trent University, where he also gained his NCTJ qualification at the same time; achieving qualifications in subbing, shorthand and media law.