Following a 30 day build up to the event, Yahoo! has finally revealed its new logo – which, at least to the untrained eye, might look remarkably similar to the old one.

However, the new logo features subtle changes including a lack of straight lines and slightly slimmer white text. As previously alluded to by the bigwigs at the search engine giant, the explanation mark remains in tact.

The revamped logo – the first time such a drastic change has been made to the Yahoo! image in almost 18 years – was unveiled after a 30 days of change Online PR campaign which involved 30 different designs being flaunted in front of the general public before the final, big reveal.

Describing the creative process behind the new logo, Yahoo! CEO, Marissa Mayer, said: “One weekend this summer, I rolled up my sleeves and dove into the trenches with our logo design team: Bob Stohrer, Marc DeBartolomeis, Russ Khaydarov, and our intern Max Ma.

“We spent the majority of Saturday and Sunday designing the logo from start to finish, and we had a ton of fun weighing every minute detail.

“We knew we wanted a logo that reflected Yahoo – whimsical, yet sophisticated. Modern and fresh, with a nod to our history. Having a human touch, personal. Proud.”

Mayer also revealed the logo avoids straight lines as, according to her, they lack a human quality. Unfortunately for Mayer however, not everyone has appreciated her and the team’s effort with the new logo.

Branding agency Albion London’s chief executive, Jason Goodman, is far from convinced with the redesign.

He said: “This is the first sign of misunderstanding the challenge. It was a fantastic opportunity. They should have done something that challenged Google.”

News brought to you by ClickThrough – a best practice digital marketing agency.

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About the author:

Martin Boonham is an online copywriter for ClickThrough Marketing, he has worked there since October 2012. He has a Masters in Print Journalism from Nottingham Trent University, where he also gained his NCTJ qualification at the same time; achieving qualifications in subbing, shorthand and media law.