Google has introduced a new yellow ad label in a continued push to make PPC advertising more visible on its Search Engine Results Pages (SERPs).

Although just in the trial phase at present, the new gold-ish yellow ad is definitely a lot clearer than the current pale yellow ad block surrounding such adverts, with clear white bold text stating ‘Ad’ stamped inside just to make it even clearer it is definitely an advertisement.

The main difference between the two is the fact the PPC adverts are typically paid for, with PPC experts using their knowledge to bid on approach keywords and phrases to ensure their ads showup on the SERPs when such phrases are used. Organic searches,  on the other hand, are natural results aided in no small part by a solid SEO strategy.

The Internet giant has been under a certain amount of pressure for some time over the AdWords created ads, with some people finding the ads blending a little too naturally into the organic search results.

Research earlier in the year by UK-based firm Bunnyfoot, even went as far as to claim 81 out of 100 customers clicked on AdWords ads over the organic options – with a surprising 40% unaware they were even clicking on ads according to the Bunnyfoot study.

Surprisingly, at least in the US, it was only in June 2013 the Federal Trade Commission it clear such ads should be more distinguishable from their organic page buddies.

At present, the test does appear to only be carried out on the Chrome browser and the success of the trial will no better be largely influenced by the increase or decrease in the Click Through Rate (CTR) of the ads with their new label.

With the label being particularly eye-catching, it will now be interesting to see whether that has a positive or negative effect on the PPC ads in general.

News brought to you by ClickThrough – experts in SEO, PPC marketing, and conversion rate optimisation services.

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About the author:

Martin Boonham is an online copywriter for ClickThrough Marketing, he has worked there since October 2012. He has a Masters in Print Journalism from Nottingham Trent University, where he also gained his NCTJ qualification at the same time; achieving qualifications in subbing, shorthand and media law.