Tablets are set to account for a staggering ten per cent of UK retail eCommerce sales this year according to a new study.

In total, the prevalence of mobile devices when it comes to shopping online is set to double this year to £8.17 billion – an 18% share of the country’s total eCommerce sales.

The research from eMarketer has calculated tablet commerce alone will treble this year to £4.74bn to take a 10.4% share of the UK’s retail eCommerce sales. Furthermore, it estimates by 2017 this figure could stand at almost £18bn – accounting for a quarter of the country’s total retail eCommerce sales.

This shift in buying patterns will mark the first time tablet devices will generate more online sales than smartphones, with tablets bossing a 58% share of mcommerce sales in the UK vs a 40.5% share generated from smartphones.

The surge in use will have in no small part been aided by eCommerce web design utilising more reactive page designs to tailor the website to each device the website is viewed on, often vastly improving the user experience cross-platform.

In the study, eMarketer also estimates 20 million people, or more than one in three consumers in the UK, will use a tablet this year.

Although sales on smartphones will continue to increase at a double-digit rate for the next few years, it will continue to be surpassed by tablets until the increasingly popular gadgets account for more than double the spend of smartphones.

Overall retail growth is expected to surge 18% to £45.40bn and will grow at a double-digit rate for the foreseeable future according to the eMarketer study.

Internet Marketing News brought to you by ClickThrough – UK web design and digital marketing experts.

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About the author:

Martin Boonham is an online copywriter for ClickThrough Marketing, he has worked there since October 2012. He has a Masters in Print Journalism from Nottingham Trent University, where he also gained his NCTJ qualification at the same time; achieving qualifications in subbing, shorthand and media law.