New research has suggested mobile could account for half of Google paid search clicks by the end of 2015.

With the rise of tablets and smartphones, there has been an exponential growth over the last year with figures suggesting 19% of Google’s overall ad revenue came from mobile search ads alone.

Marin Software has now released its 2014 study, further cementing research from fellow research firm eMarketer, who predict a 30% rise over the next three years.

Marin claim a staggering 50% of  paid search clicks will come from mobile by December 2015. Figures last year showed the growth of paid search clicks jumped 21.8% between January and December. Although focussed on the US, the figures reflect a mobile PPC trend similar to that within the UK.

Marin Software chief marketing officer, Matt Ackley, said: “We’re at the cusp of mobile becoming the dominant channel in search marketing.

“Consumers are becoming much more comfortable using their smartphones and tablets to complete transactions online, and as we see that comfort level rise advertisers will follow suit with continued investment and optimization in mobile”

Other figures in the study show CPC has risen across all devices over the past 12 months, with tablets in particular seeing the largest increase – up to 22.6%. Conversion rates on smartphones stood at a lowly 4.4% compared with 5.3% on desktop and 5.5% on tablets.

Click-Through rates (CTR) from mobiles were  higher than tablets and desktops however. The CTR figures from smartphones last year stood at 3.75% compared to 2.70% and 2.29% on tablets and desktops respectively.

Based on the major sectors across 13 countries, the full report is available for download here.

News brought to you by ClickThrough – experts in SEO, PPC Management, Multilingual Search Marketing and Website Conversion Enhancement services.

Did you find this page useful?

Comments

About the author:

Martin Boonham is an online copywriter for ClickThrough Marketing, he has worked there since October 2012. He has a Masters in Print Journalism from Nottingham Trent University, where he also gained his NCTJ qualification at the same time; achieving qualifications in subbing, shorthand and media law.