Tom Kwei brings us the latest paid search news, including why landing page optimisation is the fifth pillar of strong PPC, how to use psychology to perfect your ad copy, and why managing a PPC account is like managing a toddler.

Tackling PPC Parent Fatigue

PPC accounts are like toddlers, writes Amanda West-Brookwalter, in her most recent PPC Hero blog. Her tongue-in-cheek guide shows how managing your PPC account can leave you feeling drained but rewarded all at once, something many parents will be able to relate to.

toddlers icons

Here’s her list:

  1. Don’t leave them alone for too long. If your toddler goes quiet you know chaos waits. Similarly, leave your PPC account alone for too long and who knows what might happen? Stories can go viral and budgets can spiral out of control as a result. Set budgets, set alerts, and make sure you check your account snap shot daily.
  2. Some days will be more productive than others. Toddlers sleep, a lot. Your PPC account will also have its optimum times for activity, and inactivity. Use heat maps to determine bid modifiers for day-parting.
  3. Leaving them with someone else can cause a disaster. If you want a stress-free vacation make sure you plan and prepare everything in advance.
  4. You talk about them a lot. Parents of toddlers talk about their toddlers, constantly. PPC account managers are just the same, so utilise the many forums out there to exchange best practices.
  5. They can defy logic. Best practices don’t always work. Not all accounts will react the same way to optimisations.

Top Tips for Landing Page Optimisation

Oliver Walker explains why landing page optimisation should be the fifth pillar of your PPC campaign in his Periscopix blog. He says landing page optimisation should hold equal weight with audience, bids, content and keywords.

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Walker recommends:

  • Testing the number of form fills, altering or removing elements, changing text, playing with the style/colour/size of design elements
  • Using simple personalisation
  • Changing the landing page headline to match ad copy
  • Changing your landing page based on the weather
  • Changing your landing page based on the persona group you are talking to

Using Psychology to Perfect your PPC Copy

Margot da Cunha shared her top five psychological tricks for maximising on PPC copy in her Business2Community blog last week.

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Here’s her top five:

  1. Use emotional triggers and personal copy. Appeal to the selfish being in us all by talking direct to the customer. Use ‘You’ a lot. Couple this with copy that evokes powerful emotions, using Perry Marshall’s Swiss Army Knife approach.
  2. Tap into the fear of missing out (FOMO). Use ad customiser countdowns and limited time sales promos to encourage your customer to ‘Buy Today’.
  3. Be bizarre. People remember unusual material. Use language that will spark user interest: use adjectives, use clichés, and use attention-grabbing words like ‘Listen Up’.
  4. Prioritise ad headlines. People most remember the first and last items on a list, work your ad copy accordingly.
  5. Create a catchy slogan and then repeat it. The more someone hears something the more they will believe it.

Ask Me Anything with Optymyzr Founder

And finally… Frederick Vallaeys, ex Google and founder of Optymyzer, held a candid Ask Me Anything session on Reddit recently. Check out the session to learn his thoughts on many important topics within AdWords, including attribution, campaign structure, common PPC mistakes, landing pages, automated bidding solutions and much more.

More Paid Search News and Advice

Read our previous PPC news update: Trademark Bidding Freefalls

Want to know more about bid and budget best practices? Download your FREE Pay-Per-Click marketing guide to learn from the experts.

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About the author:

Tom Kwei is a Graduate PPC Trainee at Clickthrough Marketing. He is currently learning the ropes of pay-per-click marketing and the coffee machine. He’s also a spoken word poet who performs regularly around the country, much of his work can be found on YouTube by searching the first two words of this paragraph.