The first edition of Think Quarterly is all about data, and it is telling that the introduction mentions the aspect of speed – to connect, to market, to share, to shout etc.

The Executive Insight actually reinforces something that will be in our next book about social media – stop focussing on numbers. Whilst you need to know them, you do not always need to rely on or share them. You need to understand them, and react to the information behind the stats.

CEO of Vodafone, Guy Laurence cannily states:

You have to take the action you think will work and the numbers follow.

Google adds:

Data is something that informs his hunches – but never rules them.

Are you, as a company, spending so much time analysing marketing data that you are not taking timely decisions? You won’t be alone if you answer “Yes”.

UK companies need to start to act, rather than react to expensive consultancy projects that say what worked last year. Is something working today? Great, then keep doing it. Did it work yesterday but has dropped off today? Then change.

In a connected world, that change can be as simple as changing the hashtags you include on your tweets. Linking to new companies or trends. In the olde worlde, the oil tanker mentality meant that it could take literally months to change track. Now you can do it in 140 characters.

The ThinkQuarterly ‘magazine’ has thousands of similar insights that your business can read and apply over the coming months. Take an hour out over lunch, and then change the course of your business this afternoon.

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About the author:

A practising internet marketing consultant since 1996, Lindsey Annison helps companies improve their website marketing, online PR and information architecture. Lindsey is also a qualified adult education lecturer and author. As co-founder of the Access to Broadband Campaign, she has been instrumental in the provision of high-speed internet access to rural areas in the UK. Lindsey is also a past winner of Silicon.com's Outstanding Contribution to UK Technology