Ben & Jerry’s Facebook campaign launched this week in the UK. In further support of Fairtrade, and showing exactly how an integrated marketing campaign works, they also launched another, different, campaign via Twitter.

However, the Twitter campaign is not about ice cream flavours, nor Ben & Jerry’s, but about Fairtrade. It uses the spare letters of the alphabet that go unused frequently in short tweets. The limit on a tweet is 140 characters, and of course many tweets are far shorter than that.

Ben & Jerry’s genius on this campaign is to spot the gap (literally) in the market, and offer to take those spare tweet spaces up with Fairtrade promotions. It is really rather clever!

Fairtweets.com is timed in the run-up to World Fair Trade Day on 14th May and to date some 350,000+ characters have been used to promote the cause.

Running a corporate marketing campaign via one of the largest social networks in the world (Facebook) whilst also running a simultaneous campaign which clearly illustrates your corporate social conscience over another (Twitter) is a prime example of how to reach the largest possible audience in one hit. Whilst doing good.

So, a tweet will shortly be going out announcing this post using the Fairtweets website, and I shall report back with an update of how it appeared! And therefore, Clickthrough Marketing’s first tweet supporting Fair Trade.

UPDATE: (5 mins later!)

I won’t spoil the fun, but it’s a very dynamic app that gives lots of choices for the spare tweets and is well worth using to give Fair Trade a boost. Fairtweets.com – go try it!

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About the author:

A practising internet marketing consultant since 1996, Lindsey Annison helps companies improve their website marketing, online PR and information architecture. Lindsey is also a qualified adult education lecturer and author. As co-founder of the Access to Broadband Campaign, she has been instrumental in the provision of high-speed internet access to rural areas in the UK. Lindsey is also a past winner of Silicon.com's Outstanding Contribution to UK Technology