I’m not sure I can!

OK, where do we start for this weekend’s update?

Google added +1 last week – you knew that, I’m sure, and already there are a rake of articles about how to add +1 to your blog, as well as whether this is Quality vs Quantity again, undermining Google’s relevancy scores.

Would you like to guess how many more hours it is before the spammers take this on and put a farm on to adding +1 to every site they believe should rise in the SERPs? Is it included in the algorithm or just in personal results? Either way, how will these social signals affect your search results?

Then, hot on the heels of Google’s +1, comes +K. If you don’t know what Klout is yet, start checking the CVs that come in to your recruitment department. The “standard for influence” is this year’s hot topic right now. Although, I would like to say that putting a log in pop up box on your site without a Close button is about the most irritating part of Klout; however, I am about to reveal other irritations with it.

+K (and +1) appears to be an opportunity for 1000s of people to leap out of the woodwork and ingratiate themselves to others because ‘Klout matters’. Says who? Read this about “The Emperor’s New Klout” by Anni Bricca

Twitter this morning is ripe with +K on this and +1 on that. It may be the fastest way to lose Twitter followers yet invented ;o) Or it could be that those who have established themselves amongst their following ride this storm whilst they discover the effects….we shall see.

I need to write a Part 2 for this update.

Coming up….Empire Avenue and WWDC – Apple’s Dev conference. And a few other bits and bats!

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About the author:

A practising internet marketing consultant since 1996, Lindsey Annison helps companies improve their website marketing, online PR and information architecture. Lindsey is also a qualified adult education lecturer and author. As co-founder of the Access to Broadband Campaign, she has been instrumental in the provision of high-speed internet access to rural areas in the UK. Lindsey is also a past winner of Silicon.com's Outstanding Contribution to UK Technology