Search giant Yahoo! has looked internally to find the right candidate to take reins of its vacant head of search position: Promoting Laurie Mann to the role.

It will now be the long-time Yahoo! employee’s job to try to fix what has been a somewhat troubled relationship with partner, Microsoft.

Yahoo! CEO, Marissa Mayer, recently said the partnership, formed in 2010, was not quite panning out as she had envisioned.

Speaking at an investment meeting, the former Google hotshot said: “One of the points of the alliance is that we collectively want to grow share rather than just trading share with each other.

“We need to see monetisation working better, because we know that it can, and we’ve seen other competitors in the space illustrate how well it can work.”

Despite outlining plans to focus more on mobile in the future, Ms Mayer still sees the importance of SEO to the firm and outlined in the recent Goldman Sachs Technology conference four key areas of search competence that Yahoo! would continue to focus on. They were, comprehensiveness, relevance, speed/latency and user experience.

It will now be Laurie Mann’s responsibility to make Yahoo!’s search offering tick all these boxes, whilst at the same time offering something different from Bing and Google.

At present, Google dominates search, boasting a 67% share of the market, Microsoft is next with a 16% share, whilst Yahoo is lagging behind with roughly a 12% share of the market.

Mann will replace Sashi Seth who, in January, stepped down from the role he had occupied at the firm for the last three years.

He has been at the firm since 2002.

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About the author:

Martin Boonham is an online copywriter for ClickThrough Marketing, he has worked there since October 2012. He has a Masters in Print Journalism from Nottingham Trent University, where he also gained his NCTJ qualification at the same time; achieving qualifications in subbing, shorthand and media law.