Social media giant Facebook is rumoured to be working on a new video ads product.

Having previously rolled-out Sponsored Stories to the timelines of millions of users across the globe, video ads could be next, according to the Financial Times.

The initial trials of this new product could feature a number of globally-recognised brands – in particular those sat on Facebook’s client council.

Launched in 2011, the council was set-up to allow Facebook’s key clients and advertisers to advise on the development of its marketing and advertising products.

The council currently includes the likes of Coca Cola, Ford, Nestle amongst many others.

FT has speculated that the new video advertising product will feature in a user’s newsfeed. Here, it’ll play automatically but without sound.

Users will be able to turn on the sound, however, when they do this the video will automatically play from the beginning – effectively restarting.

Sources with knowledge of Facebook’s plans told FT that the social media site would charge in the ‘low $20s’ per every thousand views each video received.

Ads will last a maximum of 15 seconds – providing advertisers with the power to reach huge global audiences with more visual social media marketing campaigns.

Some analysts have raised qualms regarding the potentially disruptive nature of the ads, hinting that they could irritate users, which could have a detrimental effect on the amount of activity conducted on the site.

Meanwhile, Facebook has also made this year’s Fortune 500. It came in at 482nd position.

A list compiled by Fortune magazine, it feature the top 500 American companies ranked by their gross revenue.

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About the author:

Jack Adams is a copywriter at ClickThrough Marketing, and is a qualified journalist. Jack also has a degree in Journalism, with a specialist focus on citizen journalism, which includes blogs, web content and social media.