Photo sharing site Flickr is set for a major overhaul.

As well as its Flickr Pro pricing tier being kicked to the curb, all users will now receive a colossal one terrabyte of storage space.

Commenting on the Yahoo! Tumblr blog, the firm’s CEO Marissa Mayer, wrote: “We hope you’ll agree that we have made huge strides to make Flickr awesome again.”

While there is still an ads free option on the service, users will now have to cough up $49.99 in order to experience a totally ads free experience. Certainly all things considered, this latest move suggests display advertising could be set to play a far more significant role on platform in the future.

Other significant features of the revamp include the option to host longer video clips and much higher resolution photos, with a new improved photo size limit of 200MB compared to the previous 30MB of a free account and 50MB of a paid for account, a new Activity Feed and also a new app being launched for Android mobile devices.

For people desperate for more file space, the imaginatively titled doublr option allows users to double up on their one terabyte of space for $499.99.

Irrespective of the optional extra space, the move is no doubt aimed at drawing more professional photographers to the fold as the mammoth storage space dwarfs offerings from other photo sharing services. Google for example offers 15GB of free storage and Facebook, while not imposing such a limit, lowers the resolution quality of high quality photos.

At present, Flickr’s site features a slide bar showing a breakdown of how many photos one terabyte equates to at varying levels of Megapixels (MP). For example using the top of the scale, 16MP, users will be able to store 218,453 photos, for photos of seven MP  in size a terabyte equates to almost 500,000 pics.

Yahoo! acquired Flickr back in March 2005 in a deal worth a reported $35m at the time. The idea first come to pass when two former game designers, Stewart Butterfield and Caterina Fake, put the platform together in 2004 as a photo-sharing feature of a gaming project they were working on at the time.

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About the author:

Martin Boonham is an online copywriter for ClickThrough Marketing, he has worked there since October 2012. He has a Masters in Print Journalism from Nottingham Trent University, where he also gained his NCTJ qualification at the same time; achieving qualifications in subbing, shorthand and media law.